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Braille & Talking Book Library | Newsletters | Winter 2016

Prairie Trails Newsletter: South Dakota Braille and Talking Book Library

Volume 11, Issue 1 | Winter 2016
PDF download PDF Download, MP3 download MP3 Download


Inside this issue:


Notes from the Interim Director:

Patron Survey, 10² Club & more!

It is time for the Braille and Talking Book Library to do a patron survey. About 1/3 of our registered patrons will be receiving a survey (either in print form or through email). You will be asked questions about how satisfied you are with the service you receive, are you getting the kind of books that you want, etc.

If you receive the survey, please take time to complete it right away and return it. If you need assistance completing the survey, you can call your reader advisor and they will enter your answers into the online survey for you. Your cooperation is very much appreciated.

The newsletter this month is focusing on the 10² Club that was launched last year. Readers who reach the age of 100 are invited to join the 10² Club in recognition of being a lifetime active reader. The stories of those inducted into the Club during 2015 follow. We hope that you enjoy learning more about these amazing readers.

In this issue there is also a short feature article that will give you a glimpse into what happens in the Braille and Talking Book Library on any given day. Last year we selected one day to take a Snapshot look at what we do. We think you will be amazed -- we were!

Keep Reading!
Dorothy Liegl


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10² Club LAUNCHED IN 2015

ten squared book club logo The South Dakota Braille and Talking Book Library joined other states in launching a club that honors and recognizes the accomplishments of our active readers who have reached age 100 or older. Readers who reach age 100 are sent an invitation to join this elite club. They receive a certificate of merit, a letter, and a small gift. The Library also writes a newspaper release about the accomplishments of the new member and sends the release to the local newspapers.

Whenever possible, a staff member from the Braille and Talking Book Library will visit the new 10² Club member to present the certificate and gift in person. We have heard amazing stories about their lives and spent time sharing stories about favorite books read and authors to explore. We hope you will enjoy reading the following stories about our 10² Club members who were inducted in 2015.



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ENID HYDE - Pierre

ten squared member Enid Hyde with Family
10² member Enid Hyde with Family

Enid Hyde, who is 102, has a long affiliation with the South Dakota Braille and Talking Book Library. Her first exposure was when her mother signed up to get talking books. "It was a wonderful experience for her. The staff was always so helpful and genuine," Enid said.

A familiar face in the Braille and Talking Book Library for many years, Enid Hyde volunteered in the recording studios. Many of the books in the South Dakota cassette collection were read by Enid. She also read newspapers for a live radio program. In later years, she became a patron of the library. Enid was a reader who enjoyed in-depth books about literature, culture, the social sciences, and travel and geography.

When asked about what encouraged her to read, Enid said that her parents read to her as a child. Later, at the age of four, her sister taught her how to read. From that point on she was unstoppable. Classics like David Copperfield by Charles Dickens and the Oz books by L. Frank Baum are among her lifetime favorites.



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ERICA SULLIVAN - Rapid City

ten squared member Erica Sullivan with Marcia Kaup, South Dakota Braille and Talking Book Library staff
10² member Erica Sullivan with Marcia Kaup, South Dakota Braille and Talking Book Library staff

Erica Sullivan, who is 100, said "My father was in the army and my mother didn't have any interest in reading to me, but I had a caretaker for the first five years and she taught me to read by the time I was five years old."

When asked what she would like to say about being a centenarian, Erica said "Getting to 100 took a long time and I'm surprised I made it to 100. I'm taking one day at a time." She added, discovering "talking books was best thing that happened to me when I lost my sight. I don't know what I would have done without them!" Her favorite books are science fiction.



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ESTELLE HOPSON - Sturgis

ten squared member Estelle Hopson with Marcia Kaup, South Dakota Braille and Talking Book Library staff
10² member Estelle Hopson with Marcia Kaup, South Dakota Braille and Talking Book Library staff

Estelle Hopson, who is 101, said "We never did a lot of reading. My parents had eight kids and lots of chores and a big farm. My mother said she regretted that we didn't read."

When asked what she would like to say about being a centenarian, Estelle said, "Do something! I have always loved to fish, especially in East Texas. My dad would take us and we would stay a month." She added, "Shopping is also good for you, it is better than sitting!"

Estelle said she likes talking books because, "My ole' eyes won't let me read anymore. I wanted to keep reading the Bible. Now I can read it every day."

Other activities that Estelle enjoys include church, dominos and playing cards. She also said, "I love to dance, the Charleston is my favorite. My mother played Turkey in the Straw real fast and we would go out on the front porch and dance the Charleston. We would hope that cars would go by and see us dance, they would honk, you know. And sometimes they would throw us money. Oh, we loved that!"



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FLORENCE FAGRELIUS - Sioux Falls

ten squared member Florence Fagrelius with friends and family
10² member Florence Fagrelius with friends and family

Florence Fagrelius, who is 102, said she has been a lifelong reader and the first book she remembers reading was the Greek myth Jason and the Golden Fleece. "It took me forever," she said.

When asked what she would like to say about being a centenarian, Florence said, "It has been an interesting life. I've always been relatively healthy and so I've gotten to be active and do many things, and see so many things. I have been lucky!"

Florence said she started getting talking books in the late 1980s and still reads 2 or 3 a week. She likes talking books because, "It is wonderful, so convenient. I can't imagine how boring it would be if I didn't have these books. I like the variety of reading material I get, too. It keeps me company. It helps me learn lots about history and I enjoy especially the biographies about people like JFK and Lyndon Johnson and the O'Reilly books." Her favorite book is The President's Wives by Margaret Truman.



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GLADYS PERKINS - Sioux Falls

Gladys Perkins, who is 102, said "I have always liked books. My parents didn't read to me. I remember a story about penguins but don't remember the name of the book. I still like penguins."

When asked what she would like to say about being a centenarian, Gladys said, "It's been great. I've had a great life and am probably luckier than most. It was never a goal to reach an old age, it just happened."

Gladys said she likes talking books because, "It has saved me money because I didn't have to go to the library to get books. I think it is great that there isn't a charge and the books are so easy to return." Her favorite book is Gone With the Wind. She said, "It took me a very long time to read it and there were times when my husband would come in for a meal and it wasn't ready. Sometimes I had to hide the book!"



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MARY ACKERMAN - Clark

ten squared member Mary Ackerman
10² member Mary Ackerman

Mary Ackerman, who is 101, said she has been a lifelong reader. "My parents and my teachers read to me. My teachers read to me every morning for 15 minutes," she said.

When asked what she would like to say about being a centenarian, Mary said, "I learned a lot in my many years of living and many changes."

Mary said she started getting talking books about 10 years ago and has learned a lot. "It kept me calm -- When nervous, I just put my headphones on and it relaxes me," she said. Her favorite book is The Life of President Jefferson by Sally Henning.



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HAZEL NESS - Clark

ten squared member Hazel Ness
10² member Hazel Ness

Hazel Ness, who is 100, said "I don't remember my parents reading to me but I read a lot when I went to school. When I lived on the farm, I didn't have much time to sit down and read."

When asked what she would like to say about being a centenarian, Hazel said, "Going to school is fun in the snow. The snow could be really deep. Once in a while we went by bob sled. I remember from the Model T to the present day cars. When we heard the noise of an airplane, we all ran outside. That was a new experience!"

Hazel said she likes talking books because, "They make a big difference when you can't see!" While she doesn't have a favorite book, she said, "I liked history and about the presidents."



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IRENE CONRAD - Wilmot

ten squared member Irene Conrad with family
10² member Irene Conrad with family

Irene Conrad, who is 101, said she has been a reader for a long time but doesn't remember being read to as a child.

Irene has been a Braille and Talking Book Library patron for five years and she said "It's good for people who are house bound and like books. You can get any books you want."

Her current favorite books are inspirational fiction and gentle romances.



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IRENE GROON - Brookings

ten squared member Irene Groon with Elvita Landau, Director, Brookings Public Library
10² member Irene Groon with Elvita Landau, Director, Brookings Public Library

Irene Groon, who is 100, said she has been a lifelong reader. As a child her favorite books were Heidi by Johanna Spryi and Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. When asked about her all-time favorite book, she replied, "I had so many favorite books but the best is To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee.

When asked what she would like to say about being a centenarian, Irene said, "It's been wonderful, enjoyable, interesting."

Irene said she "can't say enough good" about the Braille and Talking Book Library. "That's a perfect program," she said. Without them, "I would have had to give up my enjoyment of reading."



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IRENE HOAR - Aberdeen

ten squared member Irene Hoar and family
10² member Irene Hoar and family

When Irene Hoar, who is 103, was asked what she remembers about reading as a child, she said that reading about Elsie Dinsmore was her favorite.

Irene also stated that she doesn't have a current favorite book but she likes to read gentle romances by authors like Lauraine Snelling and Beverly Lewis. "I'm really enjoying using the SD Braille and Talking Book Library," she said. "It gives me something to do."



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IRENE RAGELS - Aberdeen

ten squared member Irene Ragels
10² member Irene Ragels

When Irene Ragels, who is 104, was asked what she would like to say about being a centenarian, she said "I lived through the Dust Bowl. I was teaching a rural school. It was so difficult to breathe because the dust was so fine. When it became so dark, it was difficult to come up with activities to keep the children from becoming frightened. One of our activities was playing tag in the dark."

Irene also stated that she doesn't have a favorite book from her childhood but that she "read anything I could get my hands on. At that time there weren't too many children's books and I didn't have access to the ones that were available." Today the SD Braille and Talking Book Library meets her needs. "I can't think of the words to express how much I appreciate it," Irene said.



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JOSEPHINE CORLEY - Sioux Falls

ten squared member Josephine Corley
10² member Josephine Corley

Josephine Corley, who is 100, said "My mother used to take the long brown paper that they used to wrap things and tape it to the back of a door. Names and words that we had learned she would then question us about. I was reading very early in life. I went to school at 5 years old. By Christmas time I advanced to the first grade."

When asked what she would like to say about being a centenarian, Josephine said, "I enjoyed every bit of it." She added, "I can still dance. It amazes me that anyone will ask me to dance yet -- even the younger men!"

Josephine said she likes talking books because "I can still read. I am very appreciative of the program." Her favorite book is Little Women by Louisa May Alcott.



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MARGARET KETTWIG - Watertown

ten squared member Margaret Kettwig with Mike Mullin, Director of Watertown Regional Library
10² member Margaret Kettwig with Mike Mullin, Director of Watertown Regional Library

Margaret Kettwig, who is 100, said she has been a lifelong reader. "I don't remember my parents reading to me. There were six of us. They told us a lot of stories," she said.

When asked what she would like to say about being a centenarian, Margaret said, "We worked hard but had a lot of fun. If we weren't too tired, we would go to a dance on Saturday night." She likes to play cards and she likes to dance. She said, "I gave up my dance card at the age of 97 and my car too."

Margaret said she "didn't use a library too much" but remembers using one when she was in school. Her favorite kinds of books are romance, mysteries, fantasy, Christian stories, and westerns. She doesn't have one favorite book. "I thought they all were pretty good," she said.



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MARIAN SCHLEVE - Rapid City

ten squared member Marian Schleve and Marcia Kaup, South Dakota Braille and Talking Book Library staff
10² member Marian Schleve and Marcia Kaup, South Dakota Braille and Talking Book Library staff

Marian Schleve, who is 100, said "When I was little, I didn't read until I was in high school because my family was poor and I couldn't get books. I never thought about reading -- just learning English and getting through school." After completing high school, Marian became an English teacher.

Marian said that "being able to listen (to books) has changed my life. I used to do nothing but now I have something to do. It makes me feel alive." Marian's lifetime favorite book is Margaret Mitchell's Gone with the Wind.



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WELDON "PETE" OLSON - Ideal

ten squared member Weldon Pete Olson
10² member Weldon "Pete" Olson

When Weldon "Pete" Olson, who is 102, was asked what he would like to say about being a centenarian, Pete said "I have lived the kind of life I wanted to live and I think I had a good life. I used to dance a lot but my wife of 72 years passed away and I don't have a partner (now)."

Pete's Dad came over from Sweden at age 16. After he arrived he attended school and learned to read. He later taught Pete how to read.

Pete said that Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird is his favorite book of all time. Using the talking books is his "only source of entertainment anymore as my hearing and eyesight are bad," he said.

Pete remembers that when he was young he "walked past the library by school and always stopped to pick up books." Today his books arrive in the mail.



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ROSE BERTSCH - Aberdeen

ten squared member Rose Bertsch
10² member Rose Bertsch

When Rose Bertsch, who is 100, was asked what she would like to say about being a centenarian, Rose said "I have lived through World War I, World War II and several other wars. The one thing I love to do is read."

Rose also stated that she uses the books that she gets from the South Dakota Braille and Talking Book Library "all of the time" and added, "I enjoy Janette Oke books and Christian fiction."



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THELMA DAVIS - Spearfish

ten squared member Thelma Davis
10² member Thelma Davis

When Thelma Davis, who is 102, was asked what she would like to say about being a centenarian, Thelma said "It has been full and exciting. I've enjoyed each and every ‘new' thing in my lifetime."

Thelma said that Anna Sewell's Black Beauty and similar horse stories are her lifetime favorite books. She also stated that she "enjoys most of the (recorded) books" that she gets from the South Dakota Braille and Talking Book Library and added, "It gives me good listening as I make my toothbrush rugs."



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FLORENCE KARRELS - Sturgis

ten squared member Florence Karrels with family
10² member Florence Karrels with family

Florence Karrels, who is 104, comes from sturdy pioneer stock. She remembers when the Black Hills were still pretty wild.

Florence has enjoyed listening to books since her parents read to her when she was a child. As an adult she didn't have as much time to read but, since retiring, she said that the South Dakota Braille and Talking Book Library program "has enabled me to continue to read and to have many enjoyable hours. There are so many good books."

Florence doesn't have one favorite book but her favorite author is Debbie Macomber.



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What happens in Braille & Talking Book Library every day?

Snap Shot Day at the Braille and Talking Book Library is an opportunity to capture one day's activities so that you can get an overview of the work done by the staff. June 30, 2015 was Snap Shot Day.

Stacks of talking book cartridges to be processed.
Stacks of talking book cartridges to be processed

On June 30th, the Braille and Talking Book Library staff did the following:

  • 765 recorded books and magazines had mail cards printed, books and/or magazines were pulled from the shelves, each item checked out and mailed to patrons.
  • 559 digital books and 26 magazines were received, checked in, and returned to the shelves.
  • 158 new books were received and shelved.
  • Enrolled 4 new patrons and assigned them a talking book machine, ordered books, and catalogs.
  • Received 1 textbook order that included 3 volumes, checked the books out and mailed them to the requesting school.
  • The Reader Advisors received 14 emails, sent 12 emails in reply, answered 6 in-coming calls and called 22 patrons about their service requests. The Reader Advisors talked to patrons about books they wanted to read, reminded them to return overdue books and magazines, instructed an activity director how to transfer the service for a patron who was moving out of state, assisted patrons who wanted to use BARD for downloading digital books, answered questions about the services of the Library, answered questions about how to get a replacement player because their player wasn't working, notified patrons that a container was returned without the cartridge, assisted patrons who wanted to use the online catalog by giving them login information and instructions on how to search, and more.
  • Volunteers in Sioux Falls, Pierre, and Yankton worked 18 hours reading books and/or magazines.
  • Served 1 walk-in patron who needed a replacement talking book machine and additional books.

Reader Advisor Marcia Kaup
Reader Advisor Marcia Kaup

This is just a sample of the tasks completed on June 30th. These numbers reflect the work of the SD Braille and Talking Book Library staff to deliver quality service to our patrons.



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South Dakota Collection

The following books have been added to the South Dakota Collection. Please call your Reader Advisor if you would like to order any of the following titles.

book cover
"Dear Unforgettable Brother: The Stavig Letters from Norway and America, 1881-1937" By Jane Torness, John S. Rassmussen, Edvard H. Rasmussen and Betty Bergland

Pursuing a brighter future in the United States, Lars Stavig leaves his family in Norway and journeys to the prairies of Dakota Territory.

Though their paths never cross again, he and his brother continue to write, sharing their experiences across the sea. Over one hundred and thirty years have passed since Lars Stavig first wrote home to Knut Stavig. Like the lives their authors lived, their letters reflect the challenges faced by families in both Norway and America. Covering the span of five decades, these letters gained popularity through an award-winning South Dakota Public Broadcasting Corporation film. The communication among the Stavig relatives gives readers personal insight into the lives of those who emigrated and those who stayed behind.
DBS004765

book cover
"Reveille for Sioux Falls: A World War II Army Air Forces Technical School Changes a South Dakota City" By Lynwood E. Oyos

Book details the history of the World War II-era Army Air Forces Technical School in Sioux Falls and how its 1942 advent affected the development of the city during the latter half of the twentieth century. Author Lynwood E. Oyos proposes that, along with its air base, the school changed Sioux Falls in the post-World War II era as much as the railroads did in the nineteenth century. The radio communication school, where 50,000 men and women trained through 1945, brought new wealth to the community, changed social attitudes about women and minorities, stimulated construction of new homes and businesses, contributed to the cities first industrial park, and created Sioux Falls' first modern airport.
DBS004766



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Kids News:

Prairie Bud/Pasque and YARP Programs

South Dakota Children's Book Awards logos

It's not too late to cast your votes in the Prairie Bud, Prairie Pasque and YARP programs. We urge you to participate. The books that are included in the contests are listed at the following webpage.

South Dakota Young Adult Reading Program logo Be sure to select your books by your grade level when reading. Prairie Bud is for grades K-2 and Prairie Pasque is for grades 3-5. The YARP Program includes divisions for the middle school and high school reader. Audio books for these programs are available through the Braille and Talking Book Library. Place your ballot by calling the Library at 1-800-423-6665 or email Mary at mary.sjerven@state.sd.us.



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Summer Reading Program

On Your Mark Get Set READ

Be watching for details on the summer reading program in the next issue.

This program is open to all readers of the Braille and Talking Book Library ages 0 to 21.



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Holiday Closings

Please note the library will be closed on the following days. If you need assistance please leave a phone message and we will contact you the following day. It is helpful to plan your book requests accordingly.

  • February 15 - Presidents Day
  • March 25 - Good Friday, closing at noon


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The Prairie Trails Newsletter is our means of communication with all patrons of the Braille and Talking Book Library. The Prairie Trails Newsletter is made available on audio and also in braille, in large print, or on a diskette upon request and is posted on our website.

If you have any questions or comments you would like to address, or wish to request this newsletter in an alternative format, please contact the SD Braille and Talking Book Library.

Write:
South Dakota Braille & Talking Book Library
800 Governors Drive, Pierre, SD 57501

Email: talkbkreq@state.sd.us Email Link to BTB

Phone: 1-800-423-6665

The SD Braille & Talking Book Library does not endorse any service or product listed in this newsletter.

The South Dakota State Library provides leadership for innovation and excellence in libraries and services to state government.

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